stomach bypass

In gastric bypass surgery, the stomach is lowered as well as the amount of food that travels through the intestines, which slows down the pace of absorption. First, the stomach is shrunk to about 30 cc (a coffee cup) in size so that it can continue to function as a pouch. The duodenum and the initial 50–75 cm of the small intestine are then inhibited, or bypassed. Thus, due to mechanical restriction and altered intestinal-origin hormonal traffic, patients both eat less and perceive food differently. However, there is a mild malabsorption since the portions of the intestine that can absorb a portion of the consumed food are damaged.

In this surgery, the esophagus and a small part of the stomach are preserved, and the part of the intestines called the jejunum is sewn directly to the stomach. Patients switch to liquid foods first, then pureed foods and then solid foods. It may take up to 1 month for patients to switch to pureed foods. After this surgery, there will be a serious weight loss in patients, especially in the first year. However, it is also reported that the gastric pouch enlarges, especially after the 5th year, and a significant portion of the patients need correction surgeries.

This surgery is the most used method in bariatric surgery today. Post-surgery patients may need to take vitamin supplements for life. This situation is stated to the patients by the doctors and the operation decision is taken after that.
The biggest side effect of the surgery is vitamin deficiency. In addition, diarrhea and smelly gas problems can also affect socialization. All these problems are problems that can be regulated by medical treatment.

How is Gastric Bypass Surgery Performed?

Gastric Bypass is applied with laparoscopic surgery method. The closed operation is performed by opening many small incisions. Ports are placed through incisions so that the hand tools reach the abdomen. One of them is the surgical telescope connected to the video camera and the others are for the entry of specialized surgical instruments. The doctor watches the operation on a video monitor. An experienced laparoscopic surgeon can perform many procedures closed, just like open surgery.

Gastric Bypass surgery performed in 1967 for the first time in history and laparoscopic gastric bypass (Roux-en-Y) surgeries performed in 1993 have taken their places in history as the most difficult operations to be performed due to the limited surgical technologies of the time. Although it is a difficult operation to perform, Gastric Bypass has become very popular due to the use of this method and the shortening of the hospitalization period thanks to this operation, less scarring and reduced possibility of surgical site hernia.

A small stomach part is left on the side of the esophagus from the uppermost part of the stomach, where it joins with the entrance of the stomach, and it is closed and cut off in such a way that almost 90% of the stomach is disabled. In this way, an area smaller than 30 mL is created in the proximal gastric, that is, at the entrance of the stomach, and this area is called the stomach pouch. This newly created stomach pouch has a volume of almost less than 1 tea glass. In this surgery, the stomach is left in place and no part is removed. By creating a gastric pouch, the existing stomach is excluded and thus the food is ensured to reach here.

It is taken from the distal part of the small intestines (large intestine) and cut about 50-75 cm and associated with the new stomach pouch created. The end of the small intestine, which is at the back and continues to come from the inner part of bile and pancreatic fluid, is brought together with the intestine again. All these cutting, separating, joining and flaring applications are carried out with high-tech, disposable special tools known as “stapler”.

How Does Gastric Bypass Surgery Work?

With Gastric Bypass Surgery, it limits both food intake and food absorption. Almost 95% of the stomach, duodenum and upper part of the small intestine are disabled, thus reducing the stomach. Gastric bypass reduces stomach size by over 90%. The normal stomach may enlarge, sometimes up to 1000 ml. The gastric bypass pouch is 15-30 ml in size. The gastric bypass pouch, that is, the area created for the stomach, is created in the upper part of the stomach, which can stretch very little, and thus, there is no significant increase in the volume of the pouch in the long term.

The first reaction that occurs when the patient ingests a certain amount of food is the stretching of the wall of the stomach pouch, triggering the nerves that inform the brain that the stomach is full. The patient feels full as if he had eaten a large meal, whereas he ate only a few spoonfuls. Many people do not stop eating when they feel full.

But patients learn very quickly that they need to eat their next bite very slowly and carefully to keep themselves away from increasing discomfort or vomiting. Weight loss is higher than restrictive methods. The total energy intake of the individual is less and the tendency to show food intolerance is higher. For this reason, the patient loses weight both because he eats less and because what he eats enters the intestine directly towards the end of the intestine, not the beginning of the stomach.

For Which Patients Can Gastric Bypass Surgery Be Applied?

It can be applied to patients who cannot get rid of obesity and regain their form despite struggling, or who have complaints such as diabetes resistance and joint disorders along with excess weight. Gastric Bypass, which was the most widely used surgical method until almost five years ago, decreased with the sleeve gastrectomy becoming more common.

It is a method that is applied as a second surgery (revision surgery) in patients who have regained weight after sleeve gastrectomy surgery. It can be performed not only on sleeve gastrectomy, but also on all patients who have had gastric banding, gastric folding, or vertical gastroplasty. All of these procedures are performed by laparoscopic method.

What is the tube to the stomach?

The tube that connects the stomach to the outside of the body is called the esophagus. The esophagus is a muscular tube that extends from the throat to the stomach and is responsible for carrying
food and liquids from the mouth to the stomach for digestion. 
 The process of swallowing involves coordinated muscle contractions in the esophagus that propel the food or liquid downward, through a series of contractions known as peristalsis. Once the food or liquid reaches the stomach, it can then be further processed by stomach acids and digestive enzymes.

Where is the stomach tube?

I apologize for any confusion. The stomach is bdomen, beneath the ribcage and between the esophagus (which carries food from the mouth to the stomach) and the small stine (which carries partially digested food from the stomach to the large intestine).

The stomach is connected to the esophagus atthe upper end, where the esophag us enters the stomach through an opening called the lower esophageal sphincter. The lower end of the stomach is connected to the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine, through an opening called the pyloric sphincter

What is the use of stomach tube?

The term “stomach tube” may refer to different medical procedures or devices used for different purposes.

Gastric decompression: To remove excess air, fluid, or stomach contents from the stomach in cases of gastric obstruction or ileus. Enteralnutrition: To provide nutrition and hydration when a person canno t take food rally, such as in cases of severe illness, surgery, or inability to swallow. Medication administration: To deliver medications directly to the stomach, such as in cases of gastrointestinal bleeding or when oral medications cannot be given.

Gastrostomy tube: A gastrostomy tube, also known as a G-tube, is a surgically placed tube that directly enters the stomach through the abdominal wall. It is used for long-term enteral nutrition or medication administration in cases where a person cannot take food orally or through a nasogastric tube.

Orogastric tube: An orogastric tube is similar to a nasogastric tube, but it is inserted h the mouth instead of the nose. It is less commonly used than anasogast ric tube and may be used in specific situations where nasal placement is not feasible or contraindicated. The use of a stomach tube is determined by a healthcare professional based on the specific medical condition and needs of the patient.

It is important to follow proper medical guidelines and procedures when using any type of stomach tube to ensure patient safety and effectiveness of the medical
intervention.

What is the tube in the stomach for medication?

The tube that is commonly used for medication administration directly into the stomach is called a nasogastric tube (NG tube). A nasogastric tube is a flexible tube that is inserted through the nose, down the throat, and into the stomach.

It is used to deliver medications directly into the stomach in cases where oral medication administration is not possible, such as in patients who are unable to swallow or have gastrointestinal issues that prevent oral intake. Nasogastric tubes are commonly used in hospitals and other healthcare settings for various medical purposes, including medication administration. Medications can be administered through a nasogastric tube in liquid or crushed form, depending on the medication and the specific patient’s needs.

The medications can be flushed through the tube using water or other compatible fluids to ensure proper delivery and absorption in the stomach. It’s important to note that the use of nasogastric tubes for medication administration should be done by qualified healthcare professionals following appropriate guidelines and procedures to ensure patient safety and effectiveness of the medication. Proper dosages, medication compatibility, and other factors should be taken into consideration to ensure accurate and safe administration.

Does a stomach tube hurt?

The insertion of a stomach tube, such as a nasogastric tube or a gastrostomy tube, is generally done by trained healthcare professionals and is typically performed using appropriate techniques and measures to minimize discomfort or pain.

 However, the experience of discomfort or pain during the insertion of a stomach tube may vary depending on several factors, including the individual patient’s tolerance, the specific type of tube being inserted, and the skill and experience of the healthcare professional performing the procedure.

For nasogastric tube insertion, the process involves passing a flexible tube through the nose, down the throat, and into the stomach. Some patients may experience temporary discomfort or gagging sensations during the procedure, but it is usually brief and tolerable. Local anesthetics or lubricants may be used to help minimize discomfort during the procedure.

For gastrostomy tube insertion, which is a surgical procedure, local anesthesia or sedation is typically used to numb the area where the tube is being inserted, and pain management techniques are employed to minimize discomfort during and after the procedure.  Recovery from gastrostomy tube insertion may involve some discomfort or pain at the site of the incision, which can be managed with appropriate pain medication as prescribed by the healthcare provider. It’s important to communicate any discomfort or pain you may experience during a stomach tube insertion procedure to your healthcare provider so that they can take appropriate measures to minimize discomfort and ensure your comfort throughout the process.

Is gastric tube painful?

The insertion of a gastric tube, such as a nasogastric tube or a gastrostomy tube, may cause some temporary discomfort or pain for some patients, but the level of pain experienced can vary from person to person.

 The procedure is typically performed by trained healthcare professionals using appropriate techniques and measures to minimize discomfort or pain. For nasogastric tube insertion, the process involves passing a flexible tube through the nose, down the throat, and into the stomach. Some patients may experience temporary discomfort or gagging sensations during the procedure, but it is usually brief and tolerable. Local anesthetics or lubricants may be used to help minimize discomfort during the procedure.

For gastrostomy tube insertion, which is a surgical procedure, local anesthesia or sedation is typically used to numb the area where the tube is being inserted, and pain management techniques are employed to minimize discomfort during and after the procedure.  Recovery from gastrostomy tube insertion may involve some discomfort or pain at the site of the incision, which can be managed with appropriate pain medication as prescribed by the healthcare provider.

It’s important to communicate any discomfort or pain you may experience during a gastric tube insertion procedure to your healthcare provider so that they can take appropriate measures to minimize discomfort and ensure your comfort throughout the process. Pain management strategies, local anesthesia, and other comfort measures can be employed to help minimize pain associated with the insertion of a gastric tube.

Can a stomach tube be removed?

Yes, a stomach tube, such as a nasogastric tube or a gastrostomy tube, can be removed when it is no longer needed or when the patient’s condition improves. The removal process is typically performed by trained healthcare professionals using appropriate techniques and measures to ensure patient safety and comfort.

For nasogastric tube removal, the process involves gently pulling the tube out of the nose, throat, and esophagus. It is usually a quick and relatively straightforward process that does not require anesthesia or sedation in most cases. However, local anesthetics or lubricants may be used to minimize discomfort during the removal process. For gastrostomy tube removal, which is a surgical procedure, the tube is carefully and gently disconnected from the internal tract and then removed from the stoma site.

 The process is typically performed under local anesthesia or sedation, and the site is often closed with sutures or other appropriate closure methods. It’s important to have a healthcare professional perform the removal of a stomach tube to ensure that it is done safely and without causing any harm to the patient. The timing and method of tube removal will depend on the specific type of tube, the patient’s condition, and the healthcare provider’s instructions.

Close communication with the healthcare team is essential to determine the appropriate timing and method for removing a stomach tube.

How to do stomach wash?

Stomach wash, also known as gastric lavage or gastric irrigation, is a medical procedure that involves flushing out the stomach with fluids to remove its contents. It is typically performed in emergency situations, such as cases of accidental ingestion of toxins or overdoses, to prevent absorption of harmful substances from the stomach.

 Stomach wash should only be performed by trained healthcare professionals in a clinical setting using appropriate techniques and equipment. Here’s a general overview of how stomach wash is typically done: Preparation: The patient is positioned in a supine or head-down position, and vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation are monitored. The healthcare professional wears appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect against potential exposure to toxins.

Insertion of a nasogastric tube: A nasogastric tube (NG tube) is inserted through one of the patient’s nostrils and advance
down the throat into the stomach. This is done under sterile conditions and may be uncomfortable for the patient. Local anesthetics or lubricants may be used to minimize discomfort. 
Flushing the stomach: Once the NG tube is properly positioned in the stomach, sterile fluids, such as water or saline, are gently infused into the stomach through the tube. The fluids are then suctioned out to remove the stomach contents, including any toxins or substances that need to be flushed out.

Repeating the process: The process of infusing fluids into the stomach and suctioning them out may be repeated multiple times until the stomach contents are clear, and the desired outcome is achieved. The amount and type of fluid used, as well as the number of repetitions, will depend on the specific situation and the healthcare provider’s instructions.

Monitoring and care: Throughout the procedure, the patient’s vital signs, including heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation, are closely monitored. Care is taken to avoid any complications or adverse reactions during the procedure.

Post-procedure care: Once the desired outcome is achieved, the NG tube may be removed carefully by a healthcare professional. The patient’s condition is closely monitored after the procedure, and appropriate supportive care is provided as needed. It’s important to note that stomach wash is a specialized medical procedure that should only be performed by trained healthcare professionals in a clinical setting using appropriate techniques and equipment.

 The procedure should be done according to the specific guidelines and protocols of the healthcare facility and under the direction of a qualified healthcare provider. Patients or caregivers should not attempt to perform stomach wash on their own without proper training and supervision from healthcare professionals.

What are the side effects of a feeding tube?

Feeding tubes, such as nasogastric tubes, gastrostomy tubes, or jejunostomy tubes, are medical devices used to deliver nutrition and hydration directly into the gastrointestinal tract in patients who are unable to eat or drink adequately on their own.

Like any medical intervention, feeding tubes may have potential side effects or complications. Some possible side effects of feeding tubes can include:

Discomfort or pain: Patients may experience discomfort or pain during the insertion of a feeding tube, especially for nasogastric tubes or gastrostomy tubes that are inserted through the skin. Local anesthetics or sedation may be used to minimize discomfort during the insertion process.

Infection: There is a risk of infection associated with the insertion site of the feeding tube, especially for gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes, which require a surgical incision. Proper care and hygiene of the insertion site are essential to minimize the risk of infection. Bleeding: There may be a risk of bleeding during the insertion of feeding tubes, particularly for gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes, which involve a surgical incision. Bleeding can occur during the insertion process or at the site of the incision.

Dislodgement or blockage: Feeding tubes can become dislodged or blocked, leading to potential interruptions in nutrition or hydration delivery. This may require repositioning or replacement of the feeding tube.

Gastrointestinal issues: Feeding tubes can sometimes cause gastrointestinal issues such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or constipation. These symptoms may be related to the presence of the feeding tube or the type of formula or medication being administered through the tube. Skin irritation or breakdown: Skin around the insertion site of a feeding tube, particularly for gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes, may be susceptible to irritation or breakdown due to the presence of the tube and contact with fluids.

Discomfort with tube presence: Some patients may experience discomfort or psychological distress related to the presence of a feeding tube, particularly if it is visible or requires ongoing care and maintenance.

Nutritional imbalances: While feeding tubes are used to deliver nutrition, improper management or administration of formulas or medications through the tube can potentially lead to imbalances in nutrients, electrolytes, or fluids.

It’s important to note that the risk of side effects or complications associated with feeding tubes can vary depending on the type of tube, the patient’s overall health status, and the management and care of the tube.

Healthcare professionals who are experienced in managing feeding tubes will take appropriate measures to minimize the risk of side effects and complications, and closely monitor patients for any signs of adverse reactions. Patients or caregivers should communicate any concerns or issues related to the feeding tube to their healthcare provider promptly.

İstanbul Hair Center
Write to Us, We Will Answer